Earth Day Facts

“When all the trees have been cut down, when all the animals have been hunted, when all the waters are polluted, when all the air is unsafe to breathe, only then will you discover you cannot eat money.”

Happy Earth Day !

April 22nd marks the annual celebration of Earth Day. Many of you may note the date but don’t know many facts about it. Here are so facts about it that you may not have known

1) The first Earth Day was celebrated on April 22, 1970.

2) Earth Day originated in the US but became recognized worldwide by .

3) On the very first Earth Day, 20 million people gathered in the streets of America to protest the industrial revolution. An environmental movement was born as a result.

4) Earth Day was founded by U.S. Senator Gaylord Nelson from Wisconsin who wanted to respond to an oil spill off Santa Barbara, California

5) In 2009, the United Nations renamed Earth Day and now calls it International Mother Earth Day. That name doesn’t appear to be catching in the U.S.

6) Homes and cars account for half of all American greenhouse gas emissions.

7) People often celebrate this day by planting trees and recycling.

8) In recent years, Earth Day has become an international day of protest so people can tell their elected officials to make preventing climate change a priorit

Day Against Deportation 4/5/14

Day Against Deportation 4/5/14

On April 5th, 30 cities across America stood up against deportations; this date marks 2 million deportations under the Obama Administration. The Center for Civic Engagement participated in a anti-deportation march and vigil in Hempstead with NDLON, La Fuente, and other community groups. The chants “Obama escucha, estamos en la lucha” and “Obama, Obama don’t deport my mama” rang from the over 60 participants marching through Hempstead. Once at the Hempstead Bus Terminal, candles were passed out and a moment of silence was given for all those who had been deported. This was a truly great event to be a part of and it was great to see so many students and community members working together. Be on the lookout for information regarding next month’s event against wage theft.

Consumption of Education: The Future of Universities in a Globalizing World

As a part of Globalization day I visited a panel composed of Hofstra professors, and one student. The most memorable part of the discussion for me was the student’s (I believe her name was Maya) stance on the topic. Maya said that her best professor at Hofstra has been Google. She argued that the Internet has an endless amount of information available at the push of a button, and that schools would have to adapt to this otherwise they would become obsolete. One of Maya’s many examples was her resume that she created by watching a “how-to” YouTube video for adobe. I can safely say that her resume was the most creative and eye-catching resume I have ever seen, but I believe there is a major flaw in her argument.

         In my opinion human interaction, is an intangible characteristic to education. The success of one on one interaction between students and professors is well known, hence the need for office hours. As a science major I could not imagine having to go through organic chemistry, but not being able to run up to Dr. Finzel’s office and ask if my structure was drawn properly or if a bond I was pointing to was being attacked.

         There are certain things that the Internet cannot clarify for you. For example had the how-to video that Maya watched been for a different version of Adobe than the one she had I am sure the entire experience would have been much more frustrating for her (lets assume she couldn’t access a video for the version of Adobe that she had). A professor’s ability come over and point out simple mistakes that sometimes evade us, is something the internet can not provide.

         Although I do agree that with progressive technology, education systems should have to adapt in some ways, I firmly disagree that they would eventually become obsolete without the changes. Although watching a video of a lecture may work for some people, I think there is a large population of students that need to raise their hand and ask a question directly to their instructor.

Join NDLON Tomorrow for the April 5th March Against Deportation

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Tomorrow the National Day Laborers Organizing Network, La Fuente, the Workplace Project, and the Center for Civic Engagement are teaming up in Hempstead as part of the national #Not1More campaign to stop deportations. In spite of his many promises and professed commitment to comprehensive immigration reform, President Barak Obama’s administration has deported more undocumented immigrants than any president before him. Tomorrow, that number will reach 2 million. We’re standing up to say that 2 million is too many.

Every day 1,100 people are deported, but these are not just statistics, they are lives. The 2 million deportations represent 2 million lives that have been deeply affected, 2 million families torn apart. When families are separated and American-born children are forced into foster care because their parents are taken away from them–it is no longer just an immigration issue, it is a human rights issue.

The Hempstead event will begin tomorrow at 5pm. We will be meeting at the Workplace Project in Hempstead and from there we’ll march to the Hempstead bus terminal. Together we will protest deportations while listening to testimonies from workers and families affected by the inhumanity of deportations. Please join us and become part of the movement.

 

Globalization Day Retrospective: We Crossed the BLVD with Judith Sloan

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This year’s globalization day came to a fun and thoughtful finish with Crossing the BLVD; a performance by veteran journalist, activist, and performer–Judith Sloan. The performance was based on a book and audio project Judith produced with her husband, Warren Lehrer. The event took place in the Speigel Theater at 7pm and brought together students and faculty members alike.

In her roughly two hour performance, Judith introduced us to the vibrant diversity of Queens, and just a few of the  many people and cultures she met while assembling this project. Pictures and audio from the book and accompanying CD enhance the show by adding music and voice overs that connect the dots for the audience. Judith guided us across the BLVD, and we felt the helplessness of a refugee trapped in a detention center, the anxiety of a gay couple escaping persecution, and the passion of Ukrainian musician Gogol Bordello. The evening ended with a brief Q&A and a newfound affection for our immigrant neighbors in Queens.

A look-back on the Globalization Day event: The Global Sweatshop Economy & What We Can Do About It

On Wednesday, March 12th at common hour, Hofstra students had the pleasure of hearing activists Charles Kernaghan and Barbara Briggs speak at Globalization Day. Kernaghan is the executive director of the Institute for Global Labour and Human Rights, and has dedicated his life to stopping inhumane working conditions across the world. If you ever check tags to see where your clothing is made, chances are they will say countries like Bangladesh, China, Honduras, etc. Kernaghan has exposed the slave-like working conditions in many of these countries highlighting multiple instances of worker deaths relating to abuse and collapsed buildings. He has helped to expose brands such as Gap, Walmart, Nike, and Victoria’s Secret that sold garments made in sweatshops. Kernaghan was very dedicated and inspiring to anyone looking to make a difference; he urged students to take a stand against injustices they come across in their lives.

For more information or to see what you can do to help visit:

http://www.globallabourrights.org/

Religious Liberties

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/03/23/opinion/sunday/crying-wolf-on-religious-liberty.html?ref=opinion

Religious liberties can be a very touchy topic. Should you protect one person’s religious liberties if it will harm someone else’s? This opinion article looks at two secular, for-profit corporations who are challenging the requirement of providing contraceptive coverage under the Affordable Care Act. This article argues that the Supreme Court should not side with these corporations- do you agree?

Long Island homeless students on the rise

Long Island homeless students on the rise

Long Island has the most homeless students of any New York community outside of New York City.

Some are housed temporarily in shelters outside the district and endure lengthy bus rides to class every day. Some have limited or no access to the technology needed to keep up in the classroom. Others don’t even eat regular meals.

The recession, a lack of affordable housing, and displacement after Superstorm Sandy have led to substantial increases in the number of Long Island students listed as homeless. Here are figures for school districts and five charter schools showing the rise during the 2008-2009 through 2012-2013 school years, both as an actual number and as a percentage of total enrollment.

Here is a map of Homeless students by district in Long Island –> http://data.newsday.com/long-island/data/education/homeless-students-2014/

Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire

On the 100th anniversary of the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire, little has changed in the global sweatshop economy. Workers are again trapped and burned to death behind locked exit gates.

One hundred years ago, the outrage over the Triangle fire led to the rallying cry, “Who will protect the working girl?” Where is that cry today? This was the subject of one of our Globalization Day sessions, when Charles Kernaghan of the Institute for Global Labour and Human Rights addressed students at Hofstra University. Check out the video, and take action!

http://www.youtube.com/user/nlcnet