Day of Dialogue Calendar XI Calendar of Events

Day of Dialogue XI
Wednesday, October 23, 2013
9 a.m. to 8 p.m.

Hofstra University’s Center for Civic Engagement
presents

Day of Dialogue XI: Reflection and Engagement for a Changing World

A day of workshops, panels and performances devoted to deliberation and reflection on some of the issues that face our community, nation and the world. Students, faculty and community members are welcome, and all events are free and open to the public.

Schedule of Panels, Workshops and Presentations:

9:05-10:00am

Deliberative Democracy Policy Forum: Re-imagining U.S. Role in the World, Pt. I
Part one of a two-part, student-facilitated deliberative discussion evaluating the role of the United States in global events and the use of force as a foreign policy tool. These sessions are part of an ongoing CCE project training students to take part in deliberative discussions in the community and enhance their civic literacy. Led by CCE LI Alliance Peace Fellows.

Location:  Library East Wing 246


10:10-11:05am

Deliberative Democracy Policy Forum: Re-imagining U.S. Role in the World, Pt. II
Part two of a two-part, student-facilitated deliberative discussion evaluating the role of the United States in global events and the use of force as a foreign policy tool. Led by CCE LI Alliance Peace Fellows.

Location: Library East Wing 246

American Muslim Communities and the Surveillance State
An assessment of the ongoing surveillance that has been carried out in Muslim communities throughout the country and here in the New York metropolitan area since the tragic events of 9/11.  Co-Sponsored by the Department of Religion, Hofstra University.

Panelists: State Senator Kevin Parker, one of the primary authors of the recently passed NYPD Inspector General bill.
Representatives from the Muslim American Civil Liberties coalition, plus other invited guests.

Room: Leo Guthart Cultural Center Theater


11:15-12:40pm    COMMON HOUR

Media, Whistleblowers and the National Security State: An Examination of Journalism and the Public’s Right to Know in the Age of Wikileaks
In October, the Committee to Protect Journalists released its first official report on Press Freedoms in the U.S., stating that journalists’ “work has become more difficult as aggressive leak investigations and prosecution have chilled certain kinds of reporting.” This panel will examine the implications of the recent leaks investigations on journalism in the U.S., and weigh issues of national security versus the public’s right to know.

Panelists: Dr. Evan Cornog, Dean, Lawrence Herbert School of Communication
Bob Keeler, Pulitzer-Prize Winning journalist, former columnist for Newsday
Moderator: Phil Rappaport, Graduate Student in Journalism, Hofstra University, co-host of Hofstra’s Morning Wake Up Call on WRHU
Location:  Leo Guthart Cultural Center Theater

Latino Heritage Month Reception
Sponsored by the Multicultural and International Student Program Office, MISPO

Room: Plaza Rooms, Student Center


12:10-1:30 p.m.

Voting Rights Under Attack? Threats and Opportunities
On several fronts both nationally and locally, changes in electoral districting and in voting laws and their interpretation have left one of our most fundamental and cherished political and civil rights seemingly under attack, at least for certain groups of voters.  This panel will identify and explain the important voting rights issues that we now face as a county and as a nation.  This timely conversation will explore what these changes mean, the current situation on Long Island, and what can be done to strengthen voting rights and voter participation.

Panelists:  Dr. Daniel Altschuler, Long Island Civic Engagement Table; Professor Grant Hayden, Maurice A. Deane School of Law
Moderator:  Professor Robin Charlow, Maurice A. Deane School of Law

Co-sponsored by the Maurice A. Deane School of Law at Hofstra University, and the Hofstra Chapter of the NAACP.

Location: Maurice A. Deane School of Law, room 205


12:50-2:10pm

After Chavez: The Latin American Left, Social Movements and U.S. Policy
What is the future of the Latin American left now in the wake of the death of Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez? Are recent mass protests in Brazil, Colombia and Mexico indications of a renewed energy of Latin American social movements, which go beyond electoral politics? This panel will examine some of these issues, with an eye on how recent developments will impact U.S. policy in the region. Co-sponsored by the Latin American and Caribbean Studies Program, LACS.

Panelists: George Ciccariello-Maher, Assistant Professor of Political Science at Drexel University; María Luisa Mendonca, director, Brazilian Network for Human Rights and Social Justice, Post Doctoral Research Fellow, Cornell University
Moderator:  Professor Brenda Elsey, Department of History, co-coordinator of LACS

Location: Library 246 East Wing


1:55-2:50pm

Crises in the Middle East: Syria, Egypt and the U.S.
The diplomatic pause resulting from Russia’s pressure on the Assad regime put the brakes on an imminent U.S. attack on Syria, but it by no means resolved the myriad issues connected to the Syrian civil war. Egypt’s internal tensions have also fallen off the media radar screen somewhat, although the divisions are profound, leading to considerable uncertainty. Adding to the complexities in the region is the stalled peace process between Israel and the Palestinians, and ongoing tensions with Iran. This panel will examine the current situation in the Middle East, and the role Washington continues to play in all these developments.

Panelists: Dr. Stephanie Nanes, Professor, Political Science, Dr. David Green, Professor, Political Science
Moderated by CCE Student Fellows

Location: Leo Guthart Cultural Center Theater


2:55-4:20pm

The European Crisis and Its Aftermath
This panel will discuss the European economic crisis and the effects that it has had both in terms of the economies in Europe as well as Europe’s ability to influence  external affairs. We will discuss what has happened since the crisis occurred and what solutions have emerged and what problems still linger inhibiting a full and speedier economic recovery.
Panelists: Constantine Alexandrakis, Department of Economics
Tina Mavrikos-Adamou, Department of Political Science
George Papaioannou, Vice Dean of the Zarb School of Business and Professor of Finance
Moderator: Carolyn Dudek, Department of Political Science

Location: Leo Guthart Cultural Center Theater

 

Grassroots Democracy in Action: Visions for Uniondale
Panelists will discuss a collaborative partnership between Hofstra’s Center for Civic Engagement and the Greater Uniondale Area Action Coalition (a coalition of 25 community organizations). In particular, panelists will highlight the importance of community organizing to ensuring that the community’s interests are respected and promoted by the redevelopment of the Coliseum and the surrounding area.
Opportunities for student participation in making the community’s vision for Uniondale and Hofstra a reality will be highlighted.

Panelists: Pearl Jacobs, President of Nostrand Gardens Civic Association; Jeannine Maynard, Co-Facilitator of the Greater Uniondale Area Action Coalition; Neville Georges, Vice President Uniondale School Board; Sherry Boucarut, Board Member, Uniondale Public Library

Organizer and Facilitator: Dr. Greg Maney, Professor of Sociology, Co-Director, Center for Civic Engagement

Location: Library 246 East Wing

International Students’ Perspectives on the U.S. Role in the World
A roundtable discussion with Hofstra University students from around the world, examining the important issues of global security, “humanitarian intervention,” and the role the U.S. plays in international affairs.
Co-sponsored by the Multicultural and International Student Program Office, MISPO

Moderators: Megan Teehan, Hofstra University Senior, Global Studies Major and CCE Fellow, and Nora Riddily, Hofstra University Sophomore, CCE Volunteer

Location: Multi-Purpose Room, Hofstra University Student Center


4:30-5:55pm

Dialogue through Documentary
Kevin Hernandez is a Mexican-American high school graduate from Hempstead.  Caitlin Rubin attends Friends Academy and grew up in Long Beach.  Their paths would likely never have crossed, but these two teenagers found themselves as filmmaking partners in Hofstra University’s Summer High School Documentary Workshop titled “Documenting Diversity.”  This five-week program brings together teenagers from diverse backgrounds and provides a space for them to document each other’s stories through filmmaking.
This session will present Kevin and Caitlin’s documentaries.  Both filmmakers will participate in a brief Q&A with Professor Aashish Kumar, Co-Program Director of Documenting Diversity and Associate Professor in the Department of Radio, Television, Film.

Location: Room 117, Lawrence Herbert School of Communication (Formerly Demptser Hall)


5:00-6:55pm

Through the Smokescreen: War and Peace in Afghanistan
Featuring Kathy Kelly, co-coordinator of Voices for Creative Non-Violence, who just returned from another lengthy visit to Afghanistan, and Buddy Bell, co-coordinator of VCNV. Both have spent considerable time in Afghanistan in recent years and have been working with people on the ground to develop non-violent alternatives for the country.
Moderated by Ariel Flajnik, Former CCE Fellow, director of the Peace Fellows Program of the LI Alliance for Peaceful Alternatives.
Co-Sponsored by the LI Alliance for Peaceful Alternatives

Location: Multi-Purpose Room, Hofstra University Student Center


6:30-8:00pm

Hunting Season: Immigration and Murder in an All-American Town

In November 2008 in Patchogue, New York, 37-year-old undocumented Ecuadorian immigrant Marcelo Lucero was attacked and murdered by a group of teenagers who had decided that night to go hunting for what they referred to as “beaners.” After Lucero’s murder, Patchogue was placed in the eye of a political storm regarding immigration, hate crimes, and tolerance in small towns. As we approach the 5-year anniversary of Marcelo Lucero’s death, it is important to recognize that hunting season isn’t over.

Speaker: Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter and Columbia University professor, Mirta Ojito, author of the book Hunting Season: Immigration and Murder in an All-American Town
Introduction by Professor Kristal Zook, Dept. of Journalism

Location: Leo Gutthart Cultural Center Theater

 

Transgender 101: The Basics on the “T” in LGBT.

The Center for Civic Engagement and the Multicultural & International Student Programs Office presents this informational discussion about what it means to be a transgender person and how to become an ally of the transgender community. Learn everything about the “T” in the LGBTQ acronym. Facilitated by members of the Hofstra and transgender community.

Location: Library 246 East Wing

They call me Q
An autobiographical one-woman show by award-winning performance artist Qurrat Ann Kadwani, They Call me Q features 13 characters and speaks to issues of culture, identity, bullying, friendship and self-love. The artist was recently a feature at the NY Fringe Festival, and will lead a Q&A with the audience about these and other issues after the performance.

Co-sponsored by the Departments of Rhetoric, Drama, RTVF, the Global Studies Program and Hofstra University Honors College.

Location: The Spiegel Theater

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